Parian and Wood Sculpture

#Parian is a type of bisque porcelain.  It is named after the Greek island of Paros which is known for the fine textured marble of the same name.  Created by Thomas Battam in 1851, it was first produced and sold by William Copeland and Thomas Garrett.  It was developed further around 1845 by Minton and was used mainly for busts and figurines.

Parian Nude

Parian Nude

 

Parian Nude close-up

Parian Nude close-up

Initially parian was used to produce relatively high quality pieces but as more and more manufacturers began producing works with it, quality suffered and it lost some of its’ desirability.  Parian with its’ marble-like beauty captured the Victorians.  It allowed the middle class to possess pieces of high art.  The woman sits with a fishing net across her thighs as she looks at an oyster clasped in her hand.

And to a piece of #rosewood , I believe, carved a long time ago.  A beautiful carving of a fisherman done in China.  With hat across his back and catch hanging at his side, he looks to have had a satisfactory day.

Peasant Fisherman carved rosewood - Chinese

Peasant Fisherman carved rosewood – Chinese

 

Peasant Fisherman in Rosewood - Chinese

Peasant Fisherman in Rosewood – Chinese

The wood of the carving has age so that it has split up the torso of the fisherman.  I like the use of glass eyes for the fisherman and the fish.

Both pieces stand around ten inches in height.  Both display artistry and finesse in craftsmanship.  I seldom buy ceramics or sculpture but both of these caught my fancy for whatever reason.

 

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