The New London Magazine

#TheNewLondonMagazine was founded in the 1730’s and ran as a ‘monthly repository of knowledge, instruction, and entertainment’ for many years.  It’s monthly publication relied on numerous correspondents who provided curious and ingenious essays in prose and verse.

Rubens drawn by Vandyke - etching from The New London Magazine 1793

Rubens drawn by Vandyke – etching from The New London Magazine 1793

The book I obtained has the monthly magazines for the year 1793.  It was at this point in the magazines history that they altered their format in printing.  They went from two columns per page to a single long line printing.  This did allow for more information to be put on the page.  Some providers of articles were, at times, somewhat effusive – more than the space allowed.  They also guaranteed to their readers that the copper-plate engravings would continue but would be of superior quality.  In regards to this end the best artists of the day were engaged to produce the engravings.

St Michael's Mount, Cornwall from The New London Magazine 1793

St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall from The New London Magazine 1793

It is, for me, a sad thing that the artists are not credited in any way in regards to their works.  Evenso, the engravings are of a very good quality.  There were normally two engravings per monthly publication and each engraving was tied to an article in that month.  I would like to convince you of the quality of the magazine and the easiest way to do that is by displaying a few more images.

Ruins of Caithness from The New London Magazine 1793

Ruins of Caithness from The New London Magazine 1793

A View of Plymouth from The New London Magazine 1793

A View of Plymouth from The New London Magazine 1793

The King and Death from The New London Magazine 1793

The King and Death from The New London Magazine 1793

I have found a copy online which is for sale which claims to be whole and has all 22 engraved plates.  There are 24 plates in my book and I know I am missing the frontispiece to the whole ( I miss the frontispiece and the last page of the alphabetical index of articles).  Aged and just slightly incomplete the book remains a fine example of printing and interesting read.

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