Statuum Marocca Norum

#StatuumMaroccaNorum is the title of a map which was created  by #JohannChristianHomann in 1728.  I like to call my version of this map ‘Beware the leviathan’

Statuum Marocca Norum - map by Johann Christian Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum – map by Johann Christian Homann @ 1728

The map is large and graphic.. Little tent cities display the domains of the desert tribes. The map also includes the Canary Islands and an inset of Madeira. In the upper left is a large cartouche with merchants, soldiers, and wild animals.  On the maps which I have seen on line there is a view of Tangier and a sea battle as well in the upper cartouche. You will notice that the view of Tangier and the naval sea battle is missing from my version.  There is a ship to be seen but only a single ship and no battle.

Statuum Marocca Norum by Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum by Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum leviathan by Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum leviathan by Homann @ 1728

The three other items which are to be found on my map and not on any other that I have seen are two leviathans – one with a great spiked dorsal fin extending down it’s spine and the other spouting water and slapping it’s mighty tail.  There is also a ship sailing up the east side of Lanzarote.

Statuum Marocca Norum inset Morocco by Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum inset Morocco by Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum inset Mequinetz by Homann @ 1728

Statuum Marocca Norum inset Mequinetz by Homann @ 1728

Along the bottom, below the map are two panoramic city views of “Morocco” (Marrakech) and “Mequinetz” (Meknes).

I’m afraid that my map as been separated down the central vertical fold.  It has also been coated with some varnish or shellac which makes taking photos hard and moisture has also led to excessive discolouration in places.

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Cuzco School

We as viewers of art, generally, see and can connect one stage in art history to another.  What we do not often see and recognise is the effect which one people’s art has on another.  One of the most obvious times in which we can observe the effects was back in the 1530’s after the Spanish conquered the Inca Empire.

Our Lady of the Milk - Nuestra Senora de La Leche - Cuzco School 17th/18th century

Our Lady of the Milk – Nuestra Senora de La Leche – Cuzco School 17th/18th century

The #CuzcoSchhol ( #EscuelaCuzquena ) was a Roman Catholic artistic tradition based in Cusco, Peru.  The Spanish wished to convert the Incas to Catholicism.  To aid in this endeavour a group of religious artists were sent to Cusco to form a school to teach drawing and painting techniques.  The results of this were not confined to the city of Cuzco but spread to other cities in the Andes as well as present day Ecuador and Bolivia.

Military Archangel - Cuzco School - 17th/18th century

Military Archangel – Cuzco School – 17th/18th century

The resulting art had exclusively religious subjects. Perspective was generally lacking and the use of reds, yellows, and earthy colours predominates in the works. They are also notable for the lavish use of gold leaf,especially with regards to images of the Virgin Mary. The works were freer than those of their European tutors with the use brighter colours and distorted, dramatic images. They adapted depictions to include their native flora and fauna as a backdrop.  As can be seen ‘warrior angels’ often in Spanish regalia became a popular motif in the #Cusquena paintings.

The two images are of two recently acquired paintings and from them one can experience all the ideas which I have been talking about in the chapter.

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Joseph Farquharson Artist

You may not recognise the artist’s name but you will recognise the art which #JosephFarquharson has created.  Joseph Farquharson (1847-1935) was a Scottish artist who specialised in country and winter scenes.  Many of these scenic paintings were turned into Christmas cards which were and still are popular.

A Joyless Winter Day after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

A Joyless Winter Day after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

I purchased this very fine oil painting this past week.  Those who recognised the name Joseph Farquharson will recognise this image.  It is entitled #AJoylessWinterDay and was painted in 1883.  The famous or final version of this image hangs in The Tate in London, England.  From my reading so far, I have found there to be 5 known studies for the final setting.

A Joyless Winter Day - Shepherd after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

A Joyless Winter Day – Shepherd after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

Farquharson was known for his winter landscapes – there is usually a human – a shepherd or farm labourer – involved also.  Many of the landscapes come from the countryside around his home Finzean.

A Joyless Winter Day - Sheep after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

A Joyless Winter Day – Sheep after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

Farquharson honed his talents in Paris where he studied under Carolus-Duran.  His ‘etra-ordinary virtuosity’ and ‘lightness of touch was praised by critic and artist alike.  In 1918, Joseph became Laird of Finzean in Aberdeenshire after the death of is father.

A Joyless Winter Day - Sheep after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

A Joyless Winter Day – Sheep after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

 

Farquharson’s realism and tension in his art comes from his painting ‘en plein air’.  Because of the harsh Scottish weather, he devised a painting hut which was pulled by a horse.  It contained a stove and was made mostly of glass to allow light and visibility.  The human and dogs which were painted were real and posed for many hours while Farquharson painted but the sheep were not.  They were ‘imitation’ sheep.  Stuffed sheep which he could move into artistic position for is painting.

A Joyless Winter Day - Footsteps after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

A Joyless Winter Day – Footsteps after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

I have tried to add a number of close-up photos of the painting so that you might appreciate the finesse and quality of this artist.  I really love the depth and 3D effect which he achieves in the painting of the footsteps in the snow.

A Joyless Winter Day - monogram after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

A Joyless Winter Day – monogram after Joseph Farquharson @ 1883

Below the matt can be seen a pair of initials JF ( the ‘f’ was normally stylised backward) in the lower left.  If this painting is by Farquharson it would be the smallest study for ‘A Joyless Winter Day’ that I have read of or seen.  The oval is 226mm tall and 346mm wide (8 7/8 x 13 5/8).   Whether it is or not the artist has sublime talent and technique which deserves to be recognised and appreciated.  I hope you enjoy.

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Art of Maps 3

Maps can be both beautiful and practical.  Both maps in today’s chapter are fine examples of both qualities.

County of Forfar, Scotland published by Robert Sayer & John Bennett @ 1777

County of Forfar, Scotland published by Robert Sayer & John Bennett @ 1777

We begin with a map by an unaccredited cartographer.  The map of the #CountyofForfar was published by #RobertSayer & John Bennett.  Sayer and Bennett began trading in 1774 although their formal partnership was recognised in 1777.  It ended in 1784 when Bennett suffered from a mental collapse.  Robert Sayer began selling prints in 1748 and grew his business by taking over other printers and publishers.  Sayers bought the businesses of Philip Overton, Herman Moll, John Senex, John Rocque, Thomas Jefferys, and Henry Overton.  This would have made him a force to contend with as a print maker and map seller.  He would have employed a great number of etchers and engravers all working under his direction.

Forfarshire is the official name of the historical county of Angus.  This hand-coloured map is a fine example of early cartographic publishing. I love the description of the body of water on the right hand side as the ‘British Ocean’.

Afbeelding van 's Gravenage - map by R. Boitet @ 1730

Afbeelding van ‘s Gravenage – map by R. Boitet @ 1730

An attractive map of The Hague by Jacob Reimer (1676-1762) published in Delft by #ReinierBoitet around 1730.  Perspective view maps, as this is, display important buildings, churches, monasteries, manors and castles.  They also often contain scenes of local interest and importance as well as coats of arms of important local families.

Two maps illustrated with precision and accuracy and  yet decoratively appealing to the eye.  They really do make you want to look at them and study them.

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Arts Combined 2

As we continue with our musical theme, we find three pieces from a set of six in the folio.  The three arts combine to please the ear and the eye.  Lyrics by Charles Jefferys, J. T. Haines and Charles H Freeman are the basis for the songs composed by Charles W. Glover.  The words and music are adorned with stipple engravings by #FrancisHoll taken from drawings performed by T W Harland.

Mirth - stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844

Mirth – stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844

Simplicity - stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844

Simplicity – stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844

#LyricalBeauties was the compilation title and I have the first three from the set of six.  The stipple engravings are No. 1 Melancholy, No. 2 Mirth, No.3 Simplicity.  I am missing ‘Coquetry, Rusticity, and Contemplation.  Each piece was meant to convey a specific quality or feeling which is suppose to impart grace or beauty to the gentler sex.  The music is light and graceful and befits each specific sentiment displayed.  The poetry is of good quality but the drawings of T W Harland are possibly the most deserving of admiration along with the engravings made from them by Francis Holl.

Melancholy - stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844

Melancholy – stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844

And so that you might enjoy the true quality of these engravings, I set here three close-ups of the ladies faces.  Wonderful technique and artistry can be seen in the finesse which these etchings display.

Mirth - stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844 close-up

Mirth – stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844 close-up

Simplicity - stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844 close-up

Simplicity – stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844 close-up

Melancholy - stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844 close-up

Melancholy – stipple engraving by Francis Holl @ 1844 close-up

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 The Duenna a Comic Opera

We continue last chapters musical theme by looking at a piece of music in the folio I acquired.  It comes from an opera called #TheDuenna originally composed in 1775.  Compiled as a three act opera by composers #ThomasLinley the elder and Thomas Linley the younger to a libretto by #RichardBrinsleySheridan.

My Native Land Good Night - poem by Byron - music by Mr. Sinclair @ 1820

My Native Land Good Night – poem by Byron – music by Mr. Sinclair @ 1820

The Duenna was considered the most popular opera of it’s day.  It was admired by Samuel Johnson, William Hazlitt and Lord Byron – who called claimed it ‘the best opera ever written’.  In London alone, it had some 256 performances in 25 years to 1800 and another 196 up to 1851.

The piece in my folio is a setting of Byron’s poem #MyNativeLandGoodNight which comes from “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage’, Canto  the First, IV.  The Pilgrimage was published between 1812 to 1818. This means that this sheet music comes from around then.  I have also found that Mr. Sinclair was certainly involved with the performance of the opera from 1820 on and possibly before 1820.  What I have not found is a score in which this song appears.  It was not in the original opera but then it was a pastiche and might have been modified as to the personnel available.  It might also be one of the reasons that Byron was so effusive in his praise.  I have found this poem set to music by a Miss Fowler but other than this setting none from the correct era.  There is no credit given to the composer of the song other than that it was adapted to this ‘beautiful air’.  A number of old Scottish and Welsh airs were used in the opera.  If anybody recognises it, please let me know.

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Arts Combined

This week, a friend at a shop I visit saved a couple of books for me to look at.  I didn’t purchase the books but I did leave with something that he did have for me but it was in such dire shape that he thought I would most likely turn it down.  It was in rough shape and if I purchased items with the idea of re-sale value then this was most likely a loser.  But I don’t and it had for me some pluses that I hope you will also enjoy.

Jenny Jones Welsh ballad composed by John Parry @ 1810?

Jenny Jones Welsh ballad composed by John Parry @ 1810?

A folio of music, separate pieces bound together.  Well loved and oft used as was visible from the rough and torn edges.

I must admit that I took this folio not so much for the music but for several images which were combined with the music.

Let’s begin with the edition of Welsh ballad #JennyJones composed by #JohnParry (#BarddAlaw) with lyrics by #CharlesMathews in 1804.  The artwork on the cover is unsigned so I cannot credit it but it is of good quality.  The other interesting part of the cover is the signature of the composer Mr. Parry.  I believe it was etched into the original plate from which the cover was printed. A beautiful piece of music and age has for me made the paper more beautiful.  To touch paper of this fine quality, to smell the ink, to admire the artistry of the printer and artists design.

God Save The Queen - published by J. Duff @ 1837

God Save The Queen – published by J. Duff @ 1837

And we will go to a version of #GodSaveTheQueen published by J. Duff around 1837.  This would have been published right around the time when the words went from God save the King to God save the Queen.  Once again the the quality of the printers workmanship is admirable and I also love that the plate marks are visible on the paper.  Enjoy.  Some other pieces next chapter.

God Save The Queen published by J. Duff @ 1837

God Save The Queen published by J. Duff @ 1837


God Save The Queen published by J. Duff @ 1837

God Save The Queen published by J. Duff @ 1837

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Raphael Tuck & Sons

For those who recognise the company name #RaphaelTuck&Sons, one would expect this chapter to be about postcards.  But it’s not.  Surprise.  Tuck & Sons was one of the most innovative companies of it’s era.  Founded by husband and wife team, Raphael and Ernestine Tuck in 1866.  It began as a little shop on Union Street in Bishopsgate, London.  He an artistic perfectionist and she an astute businesswoman revolutionised business practice.

Irises by unknown artist – entered into Raphael Tuck & Sons amateur Art Competition 1890 – on English oak panel

The Tucks went from selling and framing prints and artworks to printing postcards.  In 1880, they began a competition for artists to supply artworks which would then be used as images for their postcards.

Ten years later, in 1890, the Tucks created a #competition for amateur artists and art students.  Over 20,000 artists from across the globe entered and from these nearly 9,000 pictures were sent to London to be judged.  The competition was judged by Sir John Everett Millais, Marcus Stone, G H Broughton, and J J Solomon.  Some 2,500 were chosen – separated into categories done over 9 days – at which point the judges took three days to then select the award winners.  As with all competitions there were some differing opinions as to whether the winner was better than some of the other entrants.  The winner in the door panel classification was a design of apple blossom and butterflies.

Raphael Tuck & Sons Amateur Art Competition One Penny Stamp @ 1890

Raphael Tuck & Sons Amateur Art Competition One Penny Stamp @ 1890

The #Irises painting presented here may have been entered into the door panel class .  It bears the Tuck & Sons stamp on the rear.  I believe there were different colours and values of stamps which may co-relate to where in the world the pieces originated (supposition only).

I add a few close-ups of the individual irises for your enjoyment. I love the way the varnished has cracked (known as craquelure) on top of the watercolour paint.  To me, it adds a dimension to the image which would not have been there when first painted.

As an aside, the year 1890 was also the year in which van Gogh painted his ‘Irises’.  Seems to have been a very popular flower.  Beautiful and well worth creating an image of.

Iris by unknown artist @ 1890

Iris by unknown artist @ 1890

Iris 2 by unknown artist @ 1890

Iris 2 by unknown artist @ 1890

Iris 3 unknown artist @ 1890

Iris 3 unknown artist @ 1890

Iris 4 unknown artist @ 1890

Iris 4 unknown artist @ 1890

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Art of Willy Pogany

One might be forgiven for not recognising the name #WilliamAndrew(Willy)Pogany (1882-1955) but once one sees his artwork he becomes very memorable.  Earlier this week, I acquired a copy of #TheRimeOfTheAncientMariner by #SamuelTaylorColeridge.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - title page by Willy Pogany @ 1910

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – title page by Willy Pogany @ 1910

Pogany was born Vilmos Andreas Pogany in Hungary and was a prolific illustrator of children’s books.  He and is family moved to New York in 1914 where he resided until is death.  Pogany is known for his pen and ink drawings of myths and fables.  Much of Pogany’s work could be labelled Art Nouveau.  His artistic style draws heavily on fairy-tales.  Often dragons, sprites, nymphs, pixies, mermaids and mythical animals featured heavily in is depictions.  Exactness of botanical details was also important to Pogany.  Pogany loved to use subtle and warm pastels, watercolours, oils, but especially pen and ink.  His work is detailed and confident,and his pen and ink pieces portray the true depth of his talent.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - by Willy Pogany @ 1910

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – by Willy Pogany @ 1910

The Ancient Mariner is recognised as his masterpiece. Each page has at least two colours, sometimes with gilt and intricate borders.  Initial letters are elaborate at the beginning of every line.  Along with the illuminated title page, 20 colour plates, second colour through black-and-white plates, flowing calligraphic text, and the pen-and-ink drawings throughout the pages make this a classic piece among Pogany’s works.

A little twist in regards to my book.  The original run in 1910 was comprised of some 525 copies which were numbered and signed by Pogany himself.  In my book on consecutive pages there is an embossed stamp which reads ‘For Review With Compliments’.  This, now-a-days, means that this book would have been published prior to the first run for critics, reviewers (ARC – advanced reader copies).  These pre-run books were generally more expensive to print due to the small number printed.  The book might also not be the finished publication – due to changes suggested by those readers and critics.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner - embossed review stamp

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner – embossed review stamp

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner illustrated by Willy Pogany @ 1910

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner illustrated by Willy Pogany @ 1910

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner illustrated by Willy Pogany @ 1910

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner illustrated by Willy Pogany @ 1910

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William Hunter Artist

#WilliamHunter (1899-1963) is an artist listed in two countries.  He was born on the Isle of Mann (Scotland) but emigrated to Australia when he was eleven.  So William Hunter is listed both in Scotland and Australia.

Brumbies with Foal etching by William Hunter

Brumbies with Foal etching by William Hunter

There is little information on William Hunter online but he seems to have specialised in etching with aquatint.  I have called this image ‘#Brumbies with Foal’.  There is no title to be seen.  It is signed lower right.  The sheet has been glued to the matte (title may be behind matte and there is no number for the run or sheet).  I have not found this image on line yet.

The #etching is of sublime quality. the line, hatching, and stipple etching are combined to a superb end.

Brumbies with Foal2 etching by William Hunter

Brumbies with Foal2 etching by William Hunter


Brumbies with Foal3 etching by William Hunter

Brumbies with Foal3 etching by William Hunter

There is no aquatinting in regards to this print.  Finesse, lightness of line, exactness of image resulting in a beautiful etching.  He truly deserves to be better known.

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