Joseph Syddall artist

I recently picked up an oil painting by #JosephSyddall. Joseph Syddall (1864 – 1942) was born in Old Whittington near Chesterfield, Derbyshire. The son of a master carpenter he started his working life as a clerk in a solicitor’s office. His aptitude for drawing was noted by Miss Mary Swanwick and she financed his place at the Herkomer Institute of Art. Syddall excelled at pencil/graphite drawing and Herkomer boasted that his student was the best draughtsman in the country. His drawings earned him admittance to the Royal Academy. Syddall was hired to illustrate Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles for the The Graphic Illustrated Magazine in 1891.

The Ebb – oil on artist board by Joseph Syddall

Above is the work which I acquired. It shows the tide receding into the distance. The beach is riven with channels of water beneath a heavy and blustering sky. Visitors to the seaside sit and watch while others venture far out onto the flat to chase the tide.

The painting above is a version of the painting which Syddall left to the town of Chesterfield and its’ museum. Below is the painting which the Chesterfield Museum and Art Gallery hold. Syddall rarely dated his works so exact dates of creation are unknown and thusly are dated roughly. Most of his works come from between 1890 to 1914. One notices the differences immediately. I like the way he has added the people into the image creating an early focus which then leads outward onto the flats in the far distance.

The Ebb – oil on canvas by Joseph Syddall – image credit to the Chesterfield Museum and Art Gallery
This entry was posted in Oil Paintings and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s