Charles Rennie Mackintosh – The Walberswick Florals

#CharlesRennieMackintosh (1868-1928) is world renowned as an artist and architect. His greatest architectural masterpiece was the Glasgow School of Art. After his success working for # Honeyman&Kepple, he attempted to set up a practice of his own. The failure of this business to thrive brought on a depressive illness. The illness required that he rest and in 1914 he and his wife, Margaret, moved to #Walberswick in Suffolk. It was at this time that he concentrated on painting with watercolours producing landscapes and floral images often in collaboration with his wife.

after Charles Rennie Mackintosh – watercolour/drawing by unknown artist

It is thought that the elegant flower studies which were created during his stay in Walberswick are the best of that genre. These portrayals are delicately expressed with line and use a subtlety in colour and shading to instill a lyrical and magical quality. They were meant to be compiled and then published as a set by a company in Germany but WWI ended that possibility. Within his floral watercolours was included a small cartouche at the bottom or side providing date, subject, location, and the artist’s initials.

The watercolour shown is certainly influenced by Mackintosh’s work but it is not signed, dated or titled. It is delicately drawn and nicely coloured. I would suggest that you take a look at Mackintosh’s floral drawings some of which he did in collaboration with his wife. They are truly worth a view.

This entry was posted in Drawings and Sketches, Watercolour paintings and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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