Robin Craig Guthrie artist

When I try to draw something, there is often too much stuff on the page. The focus of today’s chapter is a drawing which certainly does not have ‘too much’. The artist #RobinCraigGuthrie (1902-1971) was born in Harding, Sussex. His father, James, was a writer,artist and printer – founder of the Pear Tree Press.

Guthrie’s studies brought him to the Slade School of Art where he studied under Philip Wilson Steer and Henry Tonks. He was a superb draughtsman which can best be seen in his portraiture. He drew and painted landscapes and portraits and even illustrated books including his fathers A Wild Garden (1924). He exhibited through the New English Art Club, Royal Academy, Goupil Gallery, Leicester Gallery, Arthur Tooth & Sons, Tate Gallery and many more. For two years Guthrie took the post of director at the School of the Museum of Fine Art in Boston in the USA. During WWII, he was given a commission as an artist to record the workings of the Army cookery School and the activities at the Auxiliary Territorial Service training bases. After the war Guthrie tutored at a number of schools and illustrated several books. His works are held by The Tate, British Museum, Victoria & Albert Museum, National Portrait Gallery and many others both public and private.

The drawing with wash which is shown here does not have superfluous renderings. A minimal amount of lines and a touch of wash is all that is used in this life drawing. How easy, he makes it look. So little to express so much. That is talent.

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