Art of the Southeast

Living where I do provides me with easy access to many wonderful sights and attractions  and there are so many places which I would love to visit.  Some of those places appear on my list because artists have taken the time to portray them.

Beachy Head by Noel Hill - watercolour

Beachy Head
by Noel Hill – watercolour

Such are the next two watercolours by Noel Hill.  The first of Beachy Head with its’ lighthouse.  Found on the south coast of England near the city of Eastbourne, Beachy Head is a small part of the chalk cliffs which form the coastline in that area.  These imposing cliffs run to a height of  530 ft (162 m).  The lighthouse was built in 1902 and was run manually for 80 years, it was fully automated in 1983.  On a truly clear day one can see for almost 40 miles looking east and close to 70 miles looking west from the cliff-top.  One cannot tell from this painting but Beachy Head Lighthouse is known for its red and white stripes.

Alfristonby Noel Hill - watercolour

Alfriston
by Noel Hill – watercolour

The village of Alfriston is one of those wonderful and quaint villages which one loves to visit.  Filled with small shops and intriguing  and inviting store front windows.  The hymn ‘Morning has Broken’ was written in Alfriston by Eleanor Farjeon relating the beauty which surrounded her in the village.  It was made famous when recorded by Cat Stevens.    Sites and attractions abound in the South Downs.  Which ones would I go to?  I’m not sure but these two would be high on my list and possibly even at the top of.

For those that  like to look at a little bit of history, here is the ‘Market Place’ at Cambridge in 1801.  A hand- coloured print by Rowlandson.  The Cambridge market is far more crowded  with people and stalls these days. As it continues to be  a vital part of  Cambridge city life.

Market Place at Cambridgeby Rowladson - 1801

Market Place at Cambridge
by Rowladson – 1801

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One Response to Art of the Southeast

  1. Ben VanderWillik says:

    Excellent Ron.
    Ben VanderWillik

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