Art in Pairs

This week I picked up four pieces from two different artists – two per artist.

In Der Campagna von Rom etching by Johann Adam Klein @ 1846

In Der Campagna von Rom
etching by Johann Adam Klein @ 1846

 

A Napoli etching by Johann Adam Klein @ 1844

A Napoli
etching by Johann Adam Klein @ 1844

Two fine etchings from a German artist. #JohannAdamKlein (1792-1875) painted a number of battle scenes which made him celebrated throughout Germany. Klein excelled as a painter of horses and portraits. He was also an engraver of wonderful ability and he reproduced many of his own works and also the pictures of other artists.  Klein had early and continuing success as an etcher, publishing his first prints at the age of nineteen, in 1811.  As with many artists of the time, he made many walking and sketching tours which supplied subjects for his etchings.

A Quiet Corner, Seaton Sluice by Charles Smith @ 1924

A Quiet Corner, Seaton Sluice
by Charles Smith @ 1924

 

Old Hartley from St Mary's Island by Charles Smith @ 1924

Old Hartley from St Mary’s Island by Charles Smith @ 1924

#CharlesSmith was an artist from the north east of England.  These two watercolours reflect a time not too long past.  A couple of hundred years ago, #SeatonSluice was the centre of a flourishing coal and glass trade, exporting to western Europe. For its size, Seaton Sluice was the centre of greater commercial activity than any other town on the North East coast, with ships of up to 300 tons burden visiting the tiny harbour.  There were 30-odd pits in the district near Hartley township where the coal was mined. Employing hundreds of seamen, and providing a living for miners, ropemakers, sailmakers, shipbuilders etc.  Today, Seaton Sluice has changed into a quiet resort which shows little sign of its industrial past.  The bottleworks and ships have long since gone, and the Seaton Burn trickles gently down into the once busy little harbour, where small fishing boats now occupy the moorings.

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