Art a la Latouche

#LouisLatouche (1829-1884) is a name that is not well known to people and possibly even to experts but to a few very famous artists he was well known.  Latouche was a painter.  His applications to exhibit his paintings at the Salon in Paris were regularly rejected.  He never really became famous unlike a good number of his associates and friends.  Not wanting to leave his artistic career behind, Latouche set himself up as an arts dealer/supplier.  His shop was located at 34 Rue Lafayette at the corner with Rue Laffitte in Paris.

Latouche Stamp @1860-1885

Latouche Stamp
@1860-1885

To the left is the stamp on the back of an oil painting I have added to my collection.  A painting done in France somewhere between 1870 and 1885.  Latouche’s wife ran the store from 1875 so that Louis could go back to painting.  She sold the shop two years after her husbands death to Paul Contet.

As an art supplier, Louis prepared canvases and boards for other artists to use.  While Luois was alive and after his death the shop was known as a place of fine colours and modern paintings.  Framing and lining were also available at the shop.  Artists’ paintings were displayed in the shop window – some causing scandal.  A painting by Monet was described  as – “It draws the whole artistic world. There’s been a mob in front of the window the entire time the exhibit lasted, and for the young, the unexpectedness of this violent painting has caused a fanatical reaction.”  Latouche’s clients included Guaguin, Gache, Gautiere, Pissarro, Monet and certainly he would also have known Manet, Renoir, Bazille, Sisley.  A veritable who’s who of #FrenchImpressionist painters at the time.  But then again his clients might also have included the #FrenchRealist painters like Courbet, Millet, Daumier or Corot who painted depictions of unprettified ‘real’ life.

Village Chapel Unsigned/undated - stamp verso @ 1860 to 1885

Village Chapel
Unsigned/undated – stamp verso @ 1860 to 1885

So to the lovely oil. Superbly done with brush and palette knife.  Sublime technique.  An eye for beautiful colour coordination  and application.  The subject is also very interesting since chapels/churches did not usually have two entrances.  Male and female entrances – I don’t know but why.  Possibly.  A friend in France says the architecture looks like it comes from the Jura area of France.  The sunlit front of the church may be the focus of the painting but for me the foliage of the tree, the wooden fence and the creeper growing on the stone wall show the real talent of this artist.

It’s nice to think that this artist board may have been handled by #Gauguin, #Monet, #Renoir, #Corot, or #Pissarro.  An amazing thought actually.

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Art from a Folio

As with last weeks chapter the images in this chapter come from a folio created by a single artist, I believe. The artist has not signed his works and all the works are created after other famous artists paintings.  Artists by the names of #AdriaenvanOstade, #HendrikHondius, #AnthonieWaterloo, and #PeterPaulRubens.

Man with Tankard aquatint with etching after Adriaen van Ostade

Man with Tankard
aquatint with etching
after Adriaen van Ostade

Man with a Tankard created by an unknown hand in the early part of the 19th century.  Van Ostade (1610-1685) was an artist during the Dutch Golden Age for painting.  He portrayed tavern scenes, village fairs, and country views and the people he painted tend to be short and ill-favoured, marked with life’s adversity.  He loved to instil humour in many of his works.  Ostade was influenced by Rembrandt and it was this influence that propelled Ostade into greatness as an artist.  His works can be found in most large galleries as well as many a private collection.

Death of a Wild Boar aquatint with etching after Hendrik Hondius

Death of a Wild Boar
aquatint with etching
after Hendrik Hondius

Flemish born engraver and cartographer, Hendrik Hondius (1573-1650) was trained in drawing and engraving.  He loved mathematics and studied perspective, architecture and fortification construction.  His artistic speciality was engraving.  He was successful as artist initially using others to publish his works but he eventually purchased a printing business and concentrated on the printing of maps, books, and portraits.

Alpheus and Arethusa aquatint with etching after Anthonie Waterloo

Alpheus and Arethusa
aquatint with etching
after Anthonie Waterloo

It is quite possible that Anthonie Waterloo was a self-taught artist.  Little is known of his early life and while living he was not truly successful at selling his paintings and supported himself by becoming an art dealer.  His oil paintings are relatively scarce but one may find his drawings, sketches and etchings in most major galleries around the world.  Waterloo travelled extensively throughout Europe which can be seen in his works.  His larger etchings and drawings are detailed down to the smallest individual detail while his smaller images contain a more impressionistic, atmospheric perspective which draws the onlooker into the focus of his work.

Rubens and his Wife aquatint with etching after Peter Paul Rubens

Rubens and his Wife
aquatint with etching
after Peter Paul Rubens

And finally to Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) who was a Flemish artist.  A leader in the extravagant Baroque style of painting which focused on movement, colour, and sensuality.  A prolific artist producing works of religious focus, historical events, hunting scenes, portraits and landscapes.  He was fond of painting full-figured women which led to the term Rubenesque when referring to plus-sized women.

Four fine aquatints with some line etching to add delineation created by an unknown hand.  All images are roughly 4 by 5 1/2 with a plate size of 6 by 7 1/2.  Small beautiful works of art.

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Art of Birds

When one considers birds in art one must consider ornithologists by the names of #PrideauxJohnSelby (1788-1867) and #JohnGould (1804-1881). A pair of British ornithologists who were and still are renowned for their studies of birds.

Merlin, Female by PJ Selby 1821

Merlin, Female
by PJ Selby
1821

I have only one etching by Selby.  It is of a female merlin perched on a rock.  Selby is one of the best-known British ornithologist/bird illustrator of 19th century.  He was the first to illustrate birds from Great Britain in life-size and in realistic action.  A wonderful hand-coloured line engraving which was created around 1826.  Selby was a great collector of specimens from which he created his drawings and etchings.  He was a magnificent artist and etcher and his friends consisted of fellow great artists and scientists such as Audobon, Gould, Swainson, Jardine and many others.

To John Gould of which I have four lithographs from his folio sized edition ‘Birds of Great Britain’ printed from 1862 to 1873.  All the plates were hand-coloured after printing.  He produced the plates with the assistance of his wife, Elizabeth, and several other artists including Edward Lear, Henry Richter, Joseph Wolf and William Hart.

Hirundo Rustica lithograph by Johnn Gould @ 1862

Hirundo Rustica
lithograph by Johnn Gould @ 1862

He is considered the founder  of ornithology in Australia. His identification of the birds now nicknamed ‘Darwin’s finches’ played a role in the inception of Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. Gould’s work is referenced in Darwin’s book, ‘On the Origin of Species’.

Chelidon Urbica lithograph by John Gould @ 1862

Chelidon Urbica
lithograph by John Gould @ 1862

 

Aegiothus Rufescens lithograph by John Gould @ 1862

Aegiothus Rufescens
lithograph by John Gould @ 1862

Aegiothus Linaria lithograph by John Gould @ 1862

Aegiothus Linaria
lithograph by John Gould @ 1862

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once again Gould was also an expert taxidermist.  Preserving many of his self-collected specimens.  John Gould  “the greatest figure in bird illustration after Audubon”.  A great accolade but in fact truly deserved.  Every sky tinted and every feather of each bird were coloured by hand; nearly two hundred and eighty thousand illustrations in the present work.  An amazing work which possibly may be the most sumptuous and costly of British bird books’

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Art of Myles Birket Foster

Today a chapter on one of the most popular artists of the Victorian period.  He was both illustrator and watercolourist – expert in both.  Born in 1825 , the seventh child of a brewer his talent as an artist was nurtured while in school as well as from tutors.  He joined the family bottling business and only went on to do the thing he loved -painting- when he suffered a severe accident with a broken bottle.

The Ride on the Donkey engraving by Miles Birket Foster

The Ride on the Donkey
engraving by Miles Birket Foster

At 16, #MylesBirketFoster became an apprentice #woodengraver under Ebeneezer Landells.  He quickly honed his art must have certainly been influenced by family friend Thomas Bewick (possibly the greatest wood engraver ever).  He produced work for PUNCH magazine and THE LONDON ILLUSTRATED NEWS.  He worked in collaboration with Edmund Evans and Henry Vizetelly.  He travelled widely working on travel books as well as poetry.

Engraving was not Birket Fosters chosen artistic field.  He was an illustrator, who although doing some of his own engraving, worked with engravers to produce his desired images.  In fact he created few original etchings.  The first two shown here are a couple of those etchings.  They are signed in the image with his monogram and titled in pencil (not shown) below the image but within the plate mark on heavy paper.

Going to the Well engraving by Myles Birket Foster

Going to the Well
engraving by Myles Birket Foster

Birket Foster was encouraged to follow his love of painting by his wife.  He painted rustic scenes and landscapes.  He built an elaborate house at Witley near Godalming.  His depictions of the Surrey countryside are still loved today.  His meticulously painted images of Victorian life are proof to his astonishing technical skill.  He became very ill in 1893. He was forced to sell his house along with his large collection of art.  He continued to painted until his death in 1899.

The Wood-wain engraving by Myles Birket Foster

The Wood-wain
engraving by Myles Birket Foster

A superb talent in both the engraving and painting fields.

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Art of St Paul’s Cathedral

When visiting #London, one of the sites to see is #St.Paul’sCathedral. I have been a number of times and this chapter is about some of the artworks which I have in regards to St. Paul’s.  Most are from regular points of view in regards to the cathedral but one is certainly a rarity which can no longer be appreciated by visitors to the cathedral or in fact anyone for it no longer exists.  I will go through chronologically almost, but will leave the most interesting artwork to last.  Two published etchings, a photograph, one artist pressed etching and a drawing with wash are this chapters images.

St. Paul's Cathedral from Winkle'as cathedrals @ 1840

St. Paul’s Cathedral from Winkle’as cathedrals @ 1840

 

St Paul's from Cheapside published by Colnaghi @ 1840

St Paul’s from Cheapside
published by Colnaghi
@ 1840

Two hand coloured etchings showing St.Paul’s from different angles.  In many ways St. Paul’s still dominates the sky line of the city of London. An iconic building for many a year and for many more.

St Paul's Cathedral photograph

St Paul’s Cathedral
photograph

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To an early photograph of St Paul’s from across the Thames.  Taken from close to where the new Millennium Bridge originates on the south side of the river.  Taken, I believe, around 1920 with a very busy waterfront.

 

 

 

 

Now, much of the water front has been redeveloped into condominiums, and flats and areas for people to meet and gather. Now to an artist pressed etching which shows St Paul’s beyond Orsman Road.  Done by M. Brand in 1976.

The Canal at Orsman Road by M. Brand @ 1976

The Canal at Orsman Road by M. Brand @ 1976

 

 

Now to an image of something few saw even when it was present in the cathedral.  During WWII London was bombed extensively by the Germans.  St. Paul’s was amazingly directly hit only once and it occurred on the 16th April, 1941.  A very large bomb did hit outside but did not exploded.  It was carefully dug out of the crater it created and taken safely away to be exploded outside the city.  But I want to talk about the one that did hit St. Paul’s.  I have seen three photos of the #St.Paul’sCathedralCrater and yesterday purchased a drawing with wash done by A. Butler in 1941.

St Paul's Cathedral Crater by A Butler @1941

St Paul’s Cathedral Crater
by A Butler @1941

It is drawn from an angle which few people would have had access to.  Drawn from inside the crypt beneath the hole which was created in the floor of the cathedral looking up into the dome.  Few people let alone artists would have been allowed into the area for safety reasons.  An image from an event in history few might now recall – most would not even know that it happened.  A time worth remembering for many and varied reasons.

 

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Art of Sister Maria Innocentia

Few will recognize the name of Sister Maria Innocentia, which is the name she took when she became a nun.  But at the mention of her last name many will associate ceramic figurines with her for her last name was Hummel.

Do I Dare charcoal & pastel drawing by Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel

Do I Dare
charcoal & pastel drawing by Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel

#BertaHummel was born in 1909.  Her artistic talent was spotted early by her father and she went on to study art in Munich.  She came from a devout Catholic family and after her studies she applied to join the Congregation of the Franciscan Sisters of Siessen.  She was accepted as a postulate and as a novice taking the name #SisterMariaInnocentia.  The convent used her talents by sending her to local schools to teach art.  She loved to draw pictures of children and the convent was so impressed they sent them to a publisher.  He loved them and published them in postcard form and later a number of her drawings in Das Hummel-Buch.  The postcards and book were seen by porcelain artwork factory owner named #FranzGoebel who was looking for a new line to produce.  An agreement was reached and Goebel was given sole right to create the figurines on her artwork.  The figurines became popular and although the war years slowed sales they were buoyed by American servicemen buying and taking them home when on leave.  Her painting titled ‘The Volunteers’ was denounced by Hitler and the distribution of her art was forbidden in Germany.

Looks Like Rain  charcoal and pastel drawing by Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel

Looks Like Rain
charcoal and pastel drawing by Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel

Hummel also drew sketches that contained the Star of David, a dangerous theme in those times. She drew angels in gowns covered with slightly skewed six-pointed stars. She designed items for the convent.  Her ‘Stations of the Cross’ truly express her artistic individuality. She symbolized the juncture of the Old and New Testaments by designing a cross with a menorah before it.  Sister Maria was diagnosed with tuberculosis in 1944 she survived to see the French liberate the convent but died on 6 November 1946 at the youthful age of 37.  Goebel ceased producing the figurines in 2008 even though they remain popular.

A life too short, a talent gone but her legacy remains and will, I hope, continue for a long time into the future.

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Art in Atlas Form

Certainly, I enjoy looking at the maps which I have but not until I collected a few had I really considered them as an art form.  In fact they are a very specific art form which has both beauty and use.  As I stated in the last chapter I recently purchased an atlas.  An atlas produced by Cassell around 1860.  Sad to say it is not complete but has an interesting twist to it.

England & Wales from Cassell's British Atlas @ 1860

England & Wales from Cassell’s British Atlas
@ 1860

 

England & Wales from Cassell's British Atlas @ 1860

England & Wales from Cassell’s British Atlas
@ 1860

Although the atlas hard cover reads Cassell’s General Atlas the title page reads Cassell’s British Atlas.  It contains a good number of the maps of the counties but, alas, not all.  The maps are drawn by #EdwardWeller, #JohnDower, B R Davies, and #JWLowry. The complete #Cassell’sBritishAtlas consists of 122 maps consisting of the counties of England and Wales, divisional maps of Scotland and Ireland, separate maps of cities and towns, and others.  Cassell’s sold their atlas as separate pages available to those who bought their ‘Weekly Dispatch’ paper. One page a month.  This collection of maps eventually grew to include much of the known world.  And this is where my atlas diverts back to what the cover title states for the last third of my atlas is made up of maps of countries. #Cassell’sGeneralFolioAtlas was made up of 60 maps of the countries of the world.

The World on Mercator's Projection by Edward Weller @ 1860

The World on Mercator’s Projection by Edward Weller @ 1860

 

Asia by Edward Weller @ 1860

Asia by Edward Weller
@ 1860

Once again not a complete set but a set of maps from a time gone.

Beautiful artworks created by superb technicians/craftsmen.  Made to be gazed upon as beauty and source of information.  Used by explores, traders, and common folk.  Now appreciated by others in a different time.

 

 

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Art of Maps II

The maps in my collection cover many areas and times and recently I picked up an atlas.  The art of map-making was at it’s most beautiful in the 16th and 17th centuries.  Prior to that maps were on the the most part utilitarian.  Undecorated and used only for navigation.  Maps came in two types – what we might call a standard aerial view and a landscape or perspective view.  I have a number of each type.

Plan Geometrique de la Plan de Paris by Charles Picquet @ 1837

Plan Geometrique de la Plan de Paris
by Charles Picquet @ 1837

A fine map of #Paris from 1837 by #CharlesPicquet (1771-1827) – map maker to the king . Published after his death this map was most likely drawn around 1826.  A detailed map which includes not only street names but also major sites of interest and importance.  No street index is found on the map so it was most probably on an additional sheet.  I have not yet found this exact map in my research so can tell you little about it.

To a perspective view of the city of #Chester. A view from the south drawn by #JBoydell in 1749.

South View of the City of Chester by John Boydell @1749

South View of the City of Chester by John Boydell @1749

At times, these perspective views have the names of prominent buildings and places added onto them to inform one what they are looking at although this is a more European trait than English.  These perspective views were also used in the mapping of specific places as is seen in the last of the images which is the #EastViewof theRuinsofthe AbbeyofReading done by M. Blackamore in 1759.  I’m afraid this print has been water stained but one can still appreciate the mapping idea which this image portrays.

East View of the Ruins of the Abbey of Reading by M Blackamore @ 1759

East View of the Ruins of the Abbey of Reading
by M Blackamore @ 1759

The beauty of maps both art and history in cohesive form.  To be admired and to be used.

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Art On Shore

The etchings today are of the sea as viewed from the shore.  A stormy sea, a shipwreck, low tide, and a calm coastal scene done by different artists.

The Morning After the Wreck etching by J Cousen @ 1847

The Morning After the Wreck
etching by J Cousen @ 1888

#TheMorningAftertheWreckofaDutchEastIndia-Man is this etchings full title.  Etched by #JCousen after a painting by C Stanfield.  Depicting the wreck of a freighter as it breaks up on a reef.  A fine depiction of the sea and those who struggle against it.  Here – a few insets to show how talented J Cousen was as an etcher.

The Morning After the Wreck Inset 1

The Morning After the Wreck Inset 1

The Morning After the Wreck Inset 2

The Morning After the Wreck Inset 2

Te Morning After the Wreck Inset 3

Te Morning After the Wreck Inset 3

Now a calmer coastal scene at low tide titled #OntheCoastofPicardy.  Etched by an unknown hand after a painting by #RichardParkesBonington.  Once again a wonderful steel engraving done in the first half of the 1800’s.

On the Coast of Picardy unknown etcher @ 1830

On the Coast of Picardy unknown etcher @ 1830

 

On The Coast of Picardy Inset 1

On The Coast of Picardy Inset 1

On The Coast of Picardy Inset 2

On The Coast of Picardy Inset 2

And to finish, a pastoral coastal scene.  Once again done by an unknown hand but from a painting by Albert Cuyp.  Etched around 1838.

Evening etching @ 1838

Evening
etching @ 1838

Evening Inset 1

Evening Inset 1

Evening Inset 2

Evening Inset 2

A post of few words but then wonderful works of art need not be long-winded but rather they are at times beyond words and need to be experienced .

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Art Aged

I often buy pieces which are not perfect.  They have been damaged in some way.  They may have age spots or imperfections in the paper or water stains.  To others they are lessened but I try to look past the imperfections to what once was.  Today two aquatint hunting scenes which have been injured through time.

The Chase aquatint - unknown engraver

The Chase
aquatint – unknown engraver

These two #foxhunting scenes have seen better days.  Both are stained.  The wood which was their backing cracked allowing moisture to affect the paper.

Death of the Fox aquatint unknown engraver

Death of the Fox
aquatint unknown engraver

Both have been cut to the plate mark removing the name of the etcher and I have not yet found either image in my searching.  Although damaged, they are still exquisite examples of  working in aquatint.  After being etched they were hand coloured.  They were and are in some ways still beautiful pieces.  I will continue to research them in the hope of finding who etched them.  And now to an etching which I talked about in a previous chapter ‘Art Flowing with Life’ and have now found more information on.

Moulin de la Galette by B Wilard ?

Le Moulin de la Galette
by B Wilard ? @ 1900

What I thought might have been a Dutch street scene with windmill turns out to be an etching of quite a well-known windmill.  This windmill is not found in Holland at all but in Paris.  It is ‘Le Moulin de la Galette’ on Rue Lepic in the Montmartre district.  In the 19th century the Debray family owned the mill and made a brown loaf called a galette and thus the name of the mill.  Since then it has had several incarnations.  It was a guinguette ( a place for drinking and dancing) and a restaurant.  #LeMoulindelaGalette has been immortalized in art by Renior, van Gogh, and Pissarro.  This etching depicts the mill as it was at the beginning of the 20th century.

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