Art of Postcards

Postcards are not something which I deliberately search for when looking at art to expand my collection but the other day I did add some postcards to my collection.  I chose these 26 postcards since they were from 1907  and produced by #RaphaelTuck&Sons.

The Peasants' Revolt 1381 postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons 1907

The Peasants’ Revolt 1381
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Sons 1907

Three sets of six cards (a complete series) in their original envelopes and all unused are from the #StAlbansPageant in 1907.  The other eight are of ‘The Lord Mayor’s Show’.  This time not in their original package envelope but still all unused.

Tuck set up business in 1866 which sold pictures and greeting cards, and eventually selling postcards, the latter being the most successful.  Their business was one of the most well known in the ‘postcard boom’ of the late 1800′s and early 1900′s.  Their contributions left a lasting effect on most of the artistic world.  The company headquarters, Raphael House, was destroyed during ‘The Blitz’ with the loss of the originals for most of their series. The company recovered to some degree but never fully.

A Captive Boadicea postcard by Raphael Tuck 1907

A Captive Boadicea
postcard by Raphael Tuck 1907

One of the  presidents of the Royal Academy stated in regards to Tuck’s influence on art.  He said, “Mr. Tuck’s graphic productions were likely more effective than all of the art galleries in the world.”  Tuck postcards have decorated drawing rooms in elegant mansions as well as country cottages with their uneven, smoky walls.  This art connoisseur observed that the world’s art galleries could only reach a few people while Mr. Tuck’s postcards went to millions of individuals at every level of society.

From humble beginnings to a world wide phenomenon.

But postcards can be very personal indeed as with this hand painted card of #TheWeavers in Canterbury.  It is one of the most photographed buildings in Canterbury.

The Weavers, Canterbury postcard painted by Mrs. Hill 1949

The Weavers, Canterbury
postcard painted by Mrs. Hill 1949

Small but nicely done.  To receive such a card would show that time had been taken to correspond and it being hand painted a step above the ordinary photo postcard.

I will continue to add postcards to my collection when I find them.  As pieces of art and pieces of history they worth collecting.

The Lord Mayor's Show postcard by Raphael Tuck & Son @ 1907

The Lord Mayor’s Show
postcard by Raphael Tuck & Son @ 1907

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